The first Hamilton Flintridge appeared around 1930, and it was advertised as the perfect sportsman’s watch. Since watches were manufactured with limited water resistance and they used to have plastic crystals, the lenses were easily prone to damage. Hamilton’s Flintridge featured a flip-top cover that could protect the watch from spills, scratches and dust. Production of the Flintridge ended prior to when Hamilton ceased its consumer business to manufacture timepieces exclusively for the military during World War II.

Hamilton Flintridge Brochure

Hamilton Flintridge Brochure (via watchtalkforums.info)

For 2014, Hamilton will release a limited run of 999 pieces of a reimagined and modern Flintridge. Through the decorated stainless steel flip-top cover you can see the current day and date only through ports in the top and bottom respectively. Swing open the cover and you’ll be greeted not by an art deco aesthetic but instead by a silver Jazzmaster dial with long silver indices and a guilloche pattern in the center. At 12 o’clock is the day of the week; at 6 o’clock rests the date. On the underside of the cover, you’ll notice heavy perlage, which, intentional or not, I found to be an homage to its watchmaking tradition that I think it’s slowly trying to revive in 2014. The watch is rated water resistant to 50 meters.

Hamilton Flintridge for 2014

Hamilton Flintridge for 2014

This watch does have a see-through caseback exposing its base caliber ETA 2834-2 with a 38-hour power reserve. Hamilton preferred I didn’t share it since the design of the rotor was not final on this sample. It comes on a leather strap with off-white stitching and a signed deployment buckle.

Hamilton Flintridge for 2014

Hamilton Flintridge for 2014

The men’s Flintridge tentative pricing is around $1,400.

Hamilton Flintridge for 2014

Hamilton Flintridge for 2014

While it’s not practical, this is one of the models I’m most excited about. After I left the viewing of Hamilton’s 2014 line, it’s one of the watches I still remain the most excited about, but I fear it will go the way of the Hamilton Ventura–an interesting piece that calls upon the brand’s heritage but doesn’t show up on many wrists because it doesn’t exhibit contemporary style and wearability. I agree with Hamilton on making this one a limited run. I’m really curious to see how buyers will respond to this piece.